City of Hope Awarded $2.5 Million Grant to Launch Nutrition Initiative


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Funded by a $2.5 million grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, City of Hope has launched a 5-year initiative to reduce cancer risk in the Los Angeles area by promoting healthy eating and physical activity, particularly among school children. The long-range plan is to replicate the initiative’s successful strategies across Southern California and nationally.

The initiative aims to combat poor diets and obesity, two key risk factors for cancer. Approximately one-third of cancer deaths in the United States each year are linked to preventable causes such as excess body weight, poor nutrition, and/or physical inactivity, according to the American Cancer Society. In the coming years, cancer cases linked to obesity are expected to increase in Los Angeles’ San Gabriel Valley, where nearly 28% of children aged 2 to 11 are overweight and 23% of teens aged 12 to 17 are obese. Lung cancer was the fourth leading cause of death in the region in 2014.

Community-Based Programs

Specifically, the initiative will focus on a number of community-based interventions that encourage physical activity and healthy eating. The institution will host two nutritional summits to raise awareness about the issue and share the initiative’s research.

City of Hope also plans to open a 1,800-square-foot farm lab and teaching kitchen that will produce vegetables grown by community members and space for classes on healthy meal preparation. In addition, a City of Hope K-12 science education program—developed in partnership with the Duarte Unified School District and National Institutes of Health—will promote students’ interest in science and research careers with a focus on nutrition.

Research and Policy

The initiative will also focus on research and policy. Two annual research grants will determine the best means to prevent cancer through dietary changes. Research will also be interwoven into the community projects funded by the grant, including collecting data on glucose levels in participants pre- and post-intervention.

In the area of policy, City of Hope will support school wellness policies and the adoption of city and/or state policy changes that promote healthy communities, especially around food policy and the environment.

“City of Hope’s ambitious initiative will bring together a diverse community of stakeholders to champion increased access to healthy foods and nutritional practices and promote exercise,” said Steven T. Rosen, MD, City of Hope’s Provost and Chief Scientific Officer, and the initiative’s principal investigator. “Making a few nutritional and lifestyle changes can have a profound impact on preventing cancer and other serious medical conditions.”

In addition, City of Hope will partner with Ludwig Cancer Research, an international community of distinguished scientists that also received a Hilton Foundation grant for colon cancer prevention. The two entities will work together to ensure minority populations use Ludwig Cancer Research’s findings on best practices for cancer prevention. City of Hope Awarded $2.5 Million Grant to Launch Nutrition Initiative Funded by a $2.5 million grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, City of Hope has launched a 5-year initiative to reduce cancer risk in the Los Angeles area by promoting healthy eating and physical activity, particularly among school children. The long-range plan is to replicate the initiative’s successful strategies across Southern California and nationally. The initiative aims to combat poor diets and obesity, two key risk factors for cancer. Approximately one-third of cancer deaths in the United States each year are linked to preventable causes such as excess body weight, poor nutrition, and/or physical inactivity, according to the American Cancer Society. In the coming years, cancer cases linked to obesity are expected to increase in Los Angeles’ San Gabriel Valley, where nearly 28% of children aged 2 to 11 are overweight and 23% of teens aged 12 to 17 are obese. Lung cancer was the fourth leading cause of death in the region in 2014. Community-Based Programs Specifically, the initiative will focus on a number of community-based interventions that encourage physical activity and healthy eating. The institution will host two nutritional summits to raise awareness about the issue and share the initiative’s research. City of Hope also plans to open a 1,800-square-foot farm lab and teaching kitchen that will produce vegetables grown by community members and space for classes on healthy meal preparation. In addition, a City of Hope K-12 science education program—developed in partnership with the Duarte Unified School District and National Institutes of Health—will promote students’ interest in science and research careers with a focus on nutrition. Research and Policy The initiative will also focus on research and policy. Two annual research grants will determine the best means to prevent cancer through dietary changes. Research will also be interwoven into the community projects funded by the grant, including collecting data on glucose levels in participants pre- and post-intervention. In the area of policy, City of Hope will support school wellness policies and the adoption of city and/or state policy changes that promote healthy communities, especially around food policy and the environment. “City of Hope’s ambitious initiative will bring together a diverse community of stakeholders to champion increased access to healthy foods and nutritional practices and promote exercise,” said Steven T. Rosen, MD, City of Hope’s Provost and Chief Scientific Officer, and the initiative’s principal investigator. “Making a few nutritional and lifestyle changes can have a profound impact on preventing cancer and other serious medical conditions.” In addition, City of Hope will partner with Ludwig Cancer Research, an international community of distinguished scientists that also received a Hilton Foundation grant for colon cancer prevention. The two entities will work together to ensure minority populations use Ludwig Cancer Research’s findings on best practices for cancer prevention. ■



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