Expert Point of View: Monika K. Krzyzanowska, MD, MPH


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Formal discussant of the trial, Monika K. Krzyzanowska, MD, MPH, of the Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto, Canada, commented on this trial assessing patient-reported outcomes for symptom monitoring. “This abstract is relevant to all of us, regardless of what cancers we treat or where we practice. This is a practice-changing study.”

“Our cancer systems are in crisis, and the current reactive approach to symptom management is part of the crisis. We need to do better, and a proactive system is better,” she added.


This abstract is relevant to all of us, regardless of what cancers we treat or where we practice. This is a practice-changing study.
— Monika K. Krzyzanowska, MD, MPH

“The survival results with the Web-based tool compare favorably with our latest U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs for metastatic solid tumors. This intervention outperformed several agents approved by the FDA for solid tumors in 2016, including eribulin [Halavan], cabozantinib [Cometriq], atezolizumab [Tecentriq], pembrolizumab [Keytruda], and nivolumab [Opdivo] in terms of survival,” she said. “Only olaratumab [Lartruvo] achieved longer survival [in soft-tissue sarcoma].” 

“This was possible because early management of symptoms allows patients to stay on treatment longer. Putting out the fire before it is out of control may also decrease treatment-related mortality,” Dr. Krzyzanowska said. ■

DISCLOSURE: Dr. Krzyzanowska reported no conflicts of interest.


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