The Best of SIO


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The following five abstracts, which include four clinical studies and one basic research study, were named the top abstracts at the 2014 International Conference of the Society for Integrative Oncology.

Therapeutic Effects of Lyophilized Leech Saliva Extract

Hassona MDH, Ammar AE, Gao TY, et al: In vivo assessment of the therapeutic effects of lyophilized leech saliva extract from (Huridinaria manillensis) on different tumor xenograft models in nude mice. 11th International Conference of the SIO. Abstract 12. Presented October 28, 2014.

This study investigated the in vivo toxicity and efficacy of leech saliva extract from Huridinaria manillensis. The researchers concluded that leech saliva extract is safe when it is administered in doses up to 20 mg/kg, with no toxicity. They also found a significant decrease in tumor growth of PC3 prostate cancer xenograph models treated with either docetaxel or leech saliva extract compared with the vehicle-cont arolled mice.

Personalized Acupuncture Therapy

Bauml J, Xie SX, Farrar JT, et al: Baseline response expectancy: A potential tool for personalized acupuncture therapy. 11th International Conference of the SIO. Abstract 23. Presented October 28, 2014.

The researchers analyzed data from a randomized control trial using electroacupuncture and sham electroacupuncture. The study was conducted among 67 women with stage I to III breast cancer who experienced joint pain attributable to aromatase inhibitors. The researchers found that the relationship between expectancy and treatment response is distinct between real and sham acupuncture. They concluded that although patients receiving electroacupuncture had a clinically significant improvement in pain regardless of expectancy, patients receiving sham acupuncture gained a benefit only if they expected one.

“Patients with baseline expectancy may gain equivalent benefit from a less aggressive form of acupuncture, such as superficial needling with minimal manipulation,” wrote the study authors.

Effect of Chinese Medicine on Colorectal Cancer Recurrence

Yang Y, Yun XU, Wang J, et al: Effect of traditional Chinese medicine on the recurrence and metastasis of stage II and III colorectal cancer after radical operation: A prospective, multicenter cohort study (the 5-year follow-up results). 11th International Conference of the SIO. Abstract 87. Presented October 28, 2014.

This study included 312 Chinese patients: 167 patients had colon cancer, and 145 had rectal cancer. All the patients had received conventional Western treatment, and follow-up visits were conducted according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. The exposure factor was defined as whether a patient used traditional Chinese medicine. The researchers concluded that long-course, high-exposure traditional Chinese medicine treatment might improve the prognosis of stage II and III colorectal cancer patients.

“The rate of recurrence and metastasis of stage II and III post radical operation in colorectal cancer patients can be reduced by 1 year of consistent treatment with syndrome differentiation traditional Chinese medicine–based therapy together with routine Western medicine treatment,” wrote the study authors.

Acupuncture in Children and Adolescents

McDaniel D, Chokshi S, Jin Z, et al: Demographic predictors of use and safety of acupuncture in children and adolescents undergoing treatment for cancer. 11th International Conference of the SIO. Abstract 116. Presented October 28, 2014.

This prospective study evaluated predictors of use and safety of acupuncture in 90 children and adolescents undergoing cancer treatment. Acupuncture was more often delivered to patients diagnosed with leukemia or lymphoma. The researchers concluded that acupuncture is widely accepted and safe among children undergoing treatment for cancer. “Sociodemographic variables and persistent symptom burden predict the use of acupuncture, suggesting target populations for the delivery and scientific evaluation of acupuncture in pediatric oncology,” wrote the study authors.

Eradicating Human Papillomavirus in Women

Smith JA, Faro J, Bai Y, et al: Evaluation of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) for the eradication of human papillomavirus infections in women. 11th International Conference of the SIO. Abstract 138. Presented October 28, 2014.

The objective of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC), a fermented mushroom extract that is commercially available and promoted for immune support, in eradicating cervical high-risk human papillomavirus infections. Ten women were enrolled in the study and prescribed 3 g of oral AHCC once daily. The researchers concluded that preliminary results from the study are consistent with their preclinical findings that AHCC appears effective for eradication of human papillomavirus infections.

“Further investigation in a formal phase II randomized placebo controlled study is planned,” according to the study abstract. ■

To read the full description of the five Best of SIO abstracts, visit http://www.integrativeonc.org/index.php/public-documents/149-best-of-sio2014-abstracts-1/file

 


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