Chief Clinical Officer’s Distinguished Chair Created at City of Hope to Honor Alexandra M. Levine, MD, MACP



Alexandra M. Levine, MD, MACP

Alexandra M. Levine, MD, MACP

A significant philanthropic gift from the Campbell family of Las Vegas, Nevada, will establish a new endowed Chair to honor City of Hope’s former Chief Medical Officer Alexandra M. Levine, MD, MACP. The recipient of the Deana and Steve Campbell Chief Clinical Officer’s Distinguished Chair, to be recruited, will help support and advance exceptional clinical services and programs to continue Dr. Levine’s legacy of holistic, patient-centered, and compassionate care.

“This Chair does more than recognize Dr. Alexandra Levine’s leadership and dedication to the mission of City of Hope,” said Robert W. Stone, President and Chief Executive Officer of City of Hope. “It is about continuing an enduring legacy of caring for patients. It is about inspiring those who come after us to always embrace and embody our credo—a credo modeled so beautifully by Dr. Levine: ‘There is no profit in curing the body if in the process we destroy the soul.’”

More About Dr. Levine

For nearly a decade, Dr. Levine served as City of Hope’s Chief Medical Officer and Dr. Norman and Melinda Payson Professor in Medicine. Dr. Levine was responsible for programs encompassing quality of service, patient safety, clinical research, clinical information management, and professional education. She served as a primary liaison with City of Hope physicians to promote collaboration across disciplines and to ensure world-class care.

Dr. Levine is also well known in the medical community for her compassion and empathy, something cancer survivor Deana Campbell has experienced firsthand. Dr. Levine was a constant presence during Ms. Campbell’s battle with lymphoma in 2009 and again in 2012. Today, Ms. Campbell is cancer-free. She praises Dr. Levine for providing comfort and healing during the most difficult time in her life.

“Hers was the first face I saw when I came to City of Hope,” said Ms. ­Campbell, who lost her father to the disease 7 years prior to receiving her own diagnosis. “She walked over and embraced me with such a big hug. I was in the arms of someone who made me feel safe, who was wildly compassionate, and who kept telling me this is our fight, not my fight.”

To celebrate Dr. Levine’s retirement from City of Hope, Ms. Campbell and her husband Steve wanted to acknowledge her compassionate care and honor her philanthropically. The announcement of the Chair was a surprise to Dr. Levine and a touching tribute, she said. ■



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