Expert Point of View: Isaac Brownell, MD, PhD


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Isaac Brownell, MD, PhD

It is important to note that nicotinamide can’t replace sun avoidance and sun protection measures in skin cancer prevention strategies, nor does it prevent sunburn.

—Isaac Brownell, MD, PhD

Isaac Brownell, MD, PhD, Investigator with the Dermatology Branch of the National Cancer Institute, commented on the findings of the Australian ONTRAC trial for The ASCO Post.

“This is an interesting finding, and it expands on prior work showing reductions in [ultraviolet]-induced DNA damage and prevention of [ultraviolet]-induced immunosuppression in the skin by nicotinamide. A prior study also found a reduction in actinic keratoses, a potential precursor to [squamous cell carcinoma], in subjects who took oral nicotinamide,” Dr. Brownell noted.

“But it is important to note,” he added, “that nicotinamide can’t replace sun avoidance and sun protection measures in skin cancer prevention strategies, nor does it prevent sunburn.”

Study senior author Diona Damian, MBBS, PhD, Professor of Dermatology at the Dermatology University of Sydney, Australia, also addressed this point in the press briefing. “We still need sunscreens … and dermatologists,” she said. ■

Disclosure: Drs. Damian and Brownell reported no potential conflicts of interest.

 


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Two daily doses of nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, significantly reduced the occurrence of nonmelanoma skin cancers by 23% in individuals considered at high risk for these lesions in an Australian study. Results of the phase III ONTRAC trial, which will be presented at the 2015 ASCO Annual...


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