Expert Point of View: Louis M. Weiner, MD


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These studies are the product of many decades of sophisticated research.… Now we are seeing a ‘glory’ moment where patients can benefit from this extensive research.
— Louis M. Weiner, MD

“These gene fusions that drive malignant processes in certain cancers are good targets for cancer therapy. These targets can be potentially disabled [by targeted therapy],” said Louis M. Weiner, MD, Director of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, DC, who moderated a press conference during the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, where this study was presented.

“These studies are the product of many decades of sophisticated research. This work was basic science, the research was hard to do, and it was not clear that it would translate to clinical utility. Now we are seeing a ‘glory’ moment where patients can benefit from this extensive research,” Dr. Weiner told listeners.

“We have to learn where these targeted therapies are most likely to work. If you don’t have these five genes or amplifications, there is no response. Nevertheless, even patients who don’t respond are teaching us about the safety of targeted agents,” Dr. Weiner stated. ■

Disclosure: Dr. Weiner has been a consultant, advisor, or review panel member or for (or has had another financial relationship with) Celldex Pharmaceuticals, Jounce Pharmaceuticals, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, Symphogen, AbbVie, CytomX Therapeutics, Immunovative Therapies, Genentech, Merck, and Novartis.


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