Fellowship Breathes ‘LIFe’ into the Careers of Young Oncologists in Developing Countries


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Through this 1-year fellowship, early-career oncologists in low- and middle-income nations are given the support and resources needed to advance their training by deepening their relationship with a U.S. or Canadian colleague and his or her institution.

The Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology supports one-on-one training and research grants for the brightest minds in cancer care around the world through the Long-term International Fellowship (LIFe) and other programs. Through this 1-year fellowship, early-career oncologists in low- and middle-income nations are given the support and resources needed to advance their training by deepening their relationship with a U.S. or Canadian colleague and his or her institution. Recipients earn valuable experience with which they can then affect change in cancer care in their home country.

Two Outstanding Recipients

In 2012 the Foundation awarded fellowships to two outstanding oncologists, both of whom are previous recipients of the Conquer Cancer Foundation of ASCO International Development and Education Award (IDEA). The first recipient, Luiz Henrique de Lima Araujo, MD, MSc, of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA), is studying “The Molecular Profile of Lung Adenocarcinoma in Brazil” at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center under the mentorship of David Carbone, MD, PhD. Lung cancer is a leading cause of death in Brazil and according to Dr. de Lima Araujo, better understanding of the epidemiological and molecular disparities among patients in each region is critical in helping define priorities for resource allocation.

The second 2012 LIFe recipient, Guochun Zhang, MD, PhD, of Guangdong General Hospital in China, is studying “Inhibiting STAT5 in Breast Cancer Prevention” at Baylor College of Medicine under the mentorship of C. Kent Osbourne, MD, and Yi Li, PhD. In China, the number of breast cancer cases is rapidly increasing. It is estimated that there will be more than 100 cases for every 100,000 women by 2021, creating a challenge for the nation’s limited supply of oncologists.1 In addition to identifying new ways to prevent breast cancer, Dr. Zhang plans to apply, and share with colleagues, his newfound knowledge to bridge the translation of research into clinical practice and increase the use of evidence-based treatment. His fellowship is supported by The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

2013 Application Cycle

The application cycle for the 2013 LIFe opens in November; visit www.conquercancerfoundation.org/life for more information. To join the Conquer Cancer Foundation in improving the care and treatment of people living with cancer in developing nations and around the world, make a gift today at www.conquercancerfoundation.org/donate. ■

Reference

1. Linos E, Spanos D, Rosner BA, et al. Effects of reproductive and demographic changes on breast cancer incidence in China: A modeling analysis. J Natl Cancer Inst 100:1352-1360, 2008.

© 2012. American Society of Clinical Oncology. All Rights Reserved.



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