Advertisement

$20 Million in Grants Awarded to Identify Therapies for COVID-19


Advertisement
Get Permission

The partners in the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator—a large-scale initiative launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome, and Mastercard—awarded $20 million in initial grants to three institutions. The University of Washington, the University of Oxford, and La Jolla Institute for Immunology will receive the first three grants to fund clinical trials to identify immunotherapies for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

In addition, newly announced funding from government and philanthropic donors has added to the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator’s initial funding. The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative committed $25 million and the UK government committed £40 million. The additional funds will allow the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator to continue making grants to study repurposed drugs and investigate biologic compounds for activity against COVID-19.

Two of the newly announced trials will fund an investigation of two well-established drugs with known antiviral properties—hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine. These drugs have been used to treat malaria and a variety of rheumatologic conditions for more than 50 years. The trials aim to determine whether the drugs are effective as pre- and postexposure preventive therapy for COVID-19. Although these drugs both show initial promise, rigorous scientific evidence is needed to make decisions on how, where, and within which populations to use them in this pandemic.

Details on Clinical Trials

The University of Washington will conduct a multisite clinical trial in Western Washington and the New York City area, in collaboration with New York University’s School of Medicine, investigating whether hydroxychloroquine can effectively prevent COVID-19 in people already exposed to the infection. The trial will enroll up to 2,000 asymptomatic men and women who are close contacts of persons with confirmed or pending COVID-19 diagnoses. Participants will be randomly assigned to receive hydroxychloroquine or a placebo over 2 weeks, and samples will be collected and tested daily to confirm new COVID-19 infections across the two groups. Sandoz, a Novartis division, has donated the hydroxychloroquine doses needed to conduct the study. Participant enrollment will begin in April, and results will be available in late 2020.

The Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit will lead a placebo-controlled prophylaxis study of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in preventing COVID-19 in at-risk health-care workers, front-line staff, and other high-risk groups. At least 40,000 participants in Asia and Europe will be randomly assigned to receive either chloroquine (East Asian countries), hydroxychloroquine (United Kingdom and Europe), or a matched film-coated placebo as daily prophylaxis for 3 months. The 1-year project, known as COPCOV, aims to determine definitively whether these drugs can prevent COVID-19 and thus protect the vital health-care workforce.

Creation of Coronavirus Immunotherapy Consortium

In addition to funding drug trials, the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator will provide $1.73 million to the La Jolla Institute for Immunology to establish a Coronavirus Immunotherapy Consortium. The effort will bring together scientists from around the world and enable them to share and evaluate candidate antibodies side by side in a blinded, multidisciplinary analysis to identify ideal therapeutic combinations. Antibody therapies can be used to protect front-line health-care workers, contacts, and others who are exposed, as well as to treat those who have already become sick.


Advertisement

Advertisement



Advertisement