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Expert Point of View: Kenneth Shain, MD, PhD


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Kenneth Shain, MD, PhD

Kenneth Shain, MD, PhD

KENNETH SHAIN, MD, PhD, Director of the Myeloma Working Group at Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, told The ASCO Post that ixazomib is “an effective drug,” but he is not ready to use it as maintenance therapy. He noted that the TOURMALINE-MM3 trial did meet its primary endpoint—but not robustly.

“The study showed a progression-free survival advantage for ixazomib, but I’d say it was underwhelming in terms of its positivity,” he commented. “It was much less effective than results seen with lenalidomide/dexamethasone. With lenalidomide/dexamethasone, the increase [in progression-free survival is] from around 2 years to 4 years or more. Here, the difference is more like 5 months. However, the findings do tell us that we have another oral option for maintenance in patients who are intolerant to lenalidomide, as about 25% [of patients] are.”

DISCLOSURE: Dr. Shain has served as an advisor/consultant for Celgene, Janssen, Takeda, and Bristol-Myers Squibb; and has received grant funding from AbbVie.


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