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ASH Honors John E. Dick, PhD, and Reed E. Drews, MD, With 2018 Mentor Award


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John E. Dick, PhD

John E. Dick, PhD

The American Society of Hematology (ASH) will recognize John E. Dick, PhD, of the University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, and Ontario Institute for Cancer Research in Toronto, and Reed E. Drews, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, with the 2018 Mentor Award for their commitment to the training and career development of early-career hematologists during the 2018 ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Diego this December.

The ASH Mentor Award was established in 2006. Each year, it recognizes two mentors in the areas of basic science, clinical investigation, education, or clinical/community care who have had a positive impact on their mentees’ careers and, through their mentees, have advanced research and patient care in the field of hematology.

Supporting Next Generation of Hematologists

Dr. Dick has supported more than 130 careers throughout his 30 years of mentoring trainees. He is a Research Chair in Stem Cell Biology, Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto, senior scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, an investigator at the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, and Director of Translational Research Initiative in Leukemia at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. He has made contributions to the study of healthy and leukemic stem cells. His scientific accomplishments have earned him previous ASH honors: the William Dameshek Prize in 2005 and the E. Donnall Thomas Prize in 2009.

Dr. Dick credits his two mentors during his postdoctoral research at the Ontario Cancer Institute and Mount Sinai Hospital Research Institute at the University of Toronto for inspiring him to become a mentor himself. His nominators lauded his support and encouragement in the laboratory, specifically with individuals who had little prior laboratory experience or were experiencing research setbacks.

Dr. Drews is being recognized for his 20 years of dedicated service mentoring about 120 fellows and 600 students. Of note, Dr. Drews promotes resilience by encouraging his trainees to participate in activities outside of medicine. He hosts a popular book club for fellows and is known to be a talented cellist and pianist.

“Drs. Dick and Drews embody the traits of our most successful mentors in that they are fully dedicated and committed to the success of their trainees in the laboratory and clinic, respectively,” noted ASH President Alexis Thompson, MD, MPH, of the Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “For all of the accomplishments of our peers that we recognize at the ASH annual meeting each year, none of them would be possible without strong mentors who consistently take the time and effort to support the next generation of hematologists.” ■


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