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Parenchymal-Sparing Hepatectomy for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases


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In a meta-analysis published by Deng et al in Cancer Medicine, researchers found parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy was associated with better perioperative outcomes vs extended hepatectomy for the treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases, without compromising long-term oncologic outcomes.

The researchers performed a meta-analysis of 18 studies that included 7,081 patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases. Perioperative and long‐term survival outcomes were pooled, and subgroup analysis and meta‐regression analysis were performed to identify potential sources of heterogeneity.

Results

Parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy was performed on 3,974 (56.1%) patients. Overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.94–1.08) and recurrence-free survival (HR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.94‐1.07) were comparable between patients who had undergone parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy vs those who had not.

Perioperative outcomes were better among patients who underwent parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy. Patients who did not undergo parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy had longer operative time, increased estimated blood loss, higher intraoperative transfusion rate, and more postoperative complications.

The authors concluded, “Given the increasing incidence of hepatic parenchyma, [parenchymal-sparing hepatectomy] offers a greater opportunity of repeat resection for intrahepatic recurrent tumors. It should be considered as an effective surgical approach for colorectal cancer liver metastases.”

Disclosures: For full disclosures of the study authors, visit onlinelibrary.wiley.com.

The content in this post has not been reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Inc. (ASCO®) and does not necessarily reflect the ideas and opinions of ASCO®.
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